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      28-08-17
Italy in the grip of “stationery fever” The new passion for stationery products is a global phenomenon. New paper, office and stationery supply stores are cropping up in major cities all over the world, from New York to London and Milan to Tokyo, with a strong legion of fans. Surprisingly, these are not just nostalgics and collectors. Even digital natives are increasingly finding that their fingers are good for more than simply tapping out WhatsApp messages or moving rapidly over their computer keyboards. For example, it is becoming increasingly common in Italy as well for both the young and old to write with fountain pens, ballpoints and pencils, use notebooks and even send cards. Insights-X-2017-Stationery-ItalyWhat is driving this newfound interest in stationery products? Many factors play a role here: some people associate certain stories with various objects which mainly draw on childhood memories. Others are attracted by the latest innovations in the shops and the new stories told by those products. And still others are increasingly turning to pen and paper due to a simple love of detail. Authors Luca Bendandi and John Z. Komurki explore this phenomenon in depth in their book “Stationery Fever – From Paper Clips to Pencils and Everything in Between” (German title: “Schreibwaren: Die Rückkehr von Stift und Papier”). The book, published by Berlin label Vetro Editions in Germany and Prestel in English, tackles among other things the history of stationery and writing instruments. From the pencil to the paper clip, “Stationery Fever” explains the origins and development of the industry and keeps the reader entertained with anecdotes on erasers and sharpeners, highlighter pens, compasses, letter openers and adhesives. Besides images of historical writing implements, new and impressive photographs of well-known brands compiled especially for the book also feature on the richly illustrated pages. One particularly interesting section is devoted to the Fratelli Bonvini stationery shop in Milan. The Italian company on Corso Lodi is a major draw for fans of print and writing culture. The print shop, founded in 1909, was bought in 2014 by six shareholders, whose enthusiasm for stationery products was the catalyst for this special project. They have left the historical shop layout intact, including the printing works, and created in this venerable setting one of the world’s most fascinating stationery shops. Insights-X-2017-Stationery-Quality-pensOpportunities for manufacturers and retailers If we consider that Italian fashion often sets the trends around the world, the new love of paper and stationery products may also have an impact on markets in other countries. Brands with iconic products and classic stationery favourites may especially benefit from this. Exquisite collectors’ pieces such as certain fountain pens, paper and compasses may also experience a renaissance. High-quality retro objects for the workplace or home office are proving popular as well. As the digital march continues, however, the trend in Italy and worldwide mainly proves that pen and paper have certainly not fallen out of fashion. Taking into account consumers’ sense of culture and how they enjoy the feel of a good product, the stationery industry will still be able to hold its own against PCs and smartphones in the 21st century.  
This text ist based on the editorial “Febbre da cancelleria” by Mario Paleari, and was first published in June 2017 in
 
La Cartoleria
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E-com to give a new face to franchising The Indian franchising industry, estimated at about Rs. 90,000 crore and growing at 25-30 per cent, will take on a new avtaar with the growth of the e-commerce industry. “Franchisees will become consumer delivery points for products and services with the growth of e-retailing,” said Mr. Gaurav Marya, President, Franchise India, an organisation that helps facilitation between franchisors and franchisees. Thanks to e-commerce, companies can now maintain a larger virtual inventory, but will exist in the brick and mortar form (as franchisees) to give the product the touch-and- feel like in the case of jewellery brands, he explained. The franchising industry, driven by the small format retail growth, will also not be impacted by the impending 100 per cent FDI in single brand retail. “Globally, retail has grown through franchising and FDI would only be for big box formats or in the back end,” said Mr. Marya, pointing out that smaller retail outlets are always franchised across the world. Franchising is the most economical form of retailing because of the reach the small format can give brands. Hence, all big brands, would continue to partner with master franchisees to take them to the strategic last mile connect, which is the consumer, he added. A franchised store is about seven per cent more efficient than a company-owned store, has almost zero shrinkage levels, and saves the entrepreneur almost 2 per cent overhead costs in HR, thus impacting sales by eight per cent, according to Mr. Marya.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            PSS Magazine / India
global
To link to all the magazines, click here
E-com to give a new face to franchising The Indian franchising industry, estimated at about Rs. 90,000 crore and growing at 25-30 per cent, will take on a new avtaar with the growth of the e-commerce industry. “Franchisees will become consumer delivery points for products and services with the growth of e-retailing,” said Mr. Gaurav Marya, President, Franchise India, an organisation that helps facilitation between franchisors and franchisees. Thanks to e-commerce, companies can now maintain a larger virtual inventory, but will exist in the brick and mortar form (as franchisees) to give the product the touch-and-feel like in the case of jewellery brands, he explained. The franchising industry, driven by the small format retail growth, will also not be impacted by the impending 100 per cent FDI in single brand retail. “Globally, retail has grown through franchising and FDI would only be for big box formats or in the back end,” said Mr. Marya, pointing out that smaller retail outlets are always franchised across the world. Franchising is the most economical form of retailing because of the reach the small format can give brands. Hence, all big brands, would continue to partner with master franchisees to take them to the strategic last mile connect, which is the consumer, he added. A franchised store is about seven per cent more efficient than a company-owned store, has almost zero shrinkage levels, and saves the entrepreneur almost 2 per cent overhead costs in HR, thus impacting sales by eight per cent, according to Mr. Marya.                                                                                                                          PSS Magazine / India